United States President Donald Trump’s travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries now has constitutional validity after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favour of it. The 5-4 majority ruling that came on Tuesday (26 June, 2018) will continue to keep Muslim immigrants away from the country. President Trump described the ruling as a ‘tremendous victory.’

The ban targets travelers from Syria, Iran, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. It also includes limited sanctions against North Korea and Venezuela. While lower courts had earlier banned various versions of the ban, this Supreme Court verdict has now made it difficult for travel ban’s opponents to counter it.

Trump’s ban that has been in place since December 2017 has already wreaked havoc for thousands of people who were seeking immigration to the U.S.

Data released by Reuters had shown that only an acutely small number of waivers were allowed on the ban after it was put to effect. This is contradictory to the administration’s stance that the waivers will have a mitigating effect on the ban.

The three broad requirements for a visa waiver as listed by Trump are that applicants must face undue hardship if denied a visa, the travel must be in the U.S. interest and the applicant must not pose a security risk. The category of ‘security risk’ is ascertained after considering ‘the information-sharing and identity-management protocols of the applicant’s country of nationality as they relate to the applicant.’

This results in a situation where people are denied visas because their countries do not meet U.S. standards for information sharing and identity management.

Even when it was brought to notice that it was unconstitutional and against U.S. immigration laws, Trump went ahead with the ban saying it was to protect U.S. residents from ‘terrorism.’ Six of the eight countries included in the ban are majority Muslim nations.